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UKRAINE: PRESIDENT LEONID KRAVCHUK WATCHES MILITARY MANOEUVRES AS THE UKRAINE PREPARES FOR POLLING DAY

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Ukrainians disheartened by political deadlock and mass poverty go to the polls on Sunday (March 27) with few seeing any prospect of the election outcome producing any improvement. President Leonid Kravchuk predicted the election would produce a "less than full-blooded parliament" and said he would seek additional powers to ensure order and proceed with the country's largely undeveloped reforms. The first parliamentary election since Ukraine secured independence in 1991 was supposed to break a constitutional logjam, oust Communist hangers-on and spur reforms when it was called ahead of term last September. The first round of the poll on Sunday has instead generated little interest among voters baffled by an electoral system which could return a crippled parliament, leave more than a hundred seats unfilled and sow political chaos. The election could also widen the divide between the country's nationalist west and the pro-Russian east and south, which have less than a firm commitment to Ukrainian statehood. Kravchuk, making his third major television appearance in a week on Friday, said that parliament, if unable to function, "will turn over its powers on the economy, corruption and fighting organised crime to the president".

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043-00037628
dc:source
Reuters News
dc:title
UKRAINE: PRESIDENT LEONID KRAVCHUK WATCHES MILITARY MANOEUVRES AS THE UKRAINE PREPARES FOR POLLING DAY
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MovingImage
mhub:credit
Reuters
dc:description
Ukrainians disheartened by political deadlock and mass poverty go to the polls on Sunday (March 27) with few seeing any prospect of the election outcome producing any improvement. President Leonid Kravchuk predicted the election would produce a "less than full-blooded parliament" and said he would seek additional powers to ensure order and proceed with the country's largely undeveloped reforms. The first parliamentary election since Ukraine secured independence in 1991 was supposed to break a constitutional logjam, oust Communist hangers-on and spur reforms when it was called ahead of term last September. The first round of the poll on Sunday has instead generated little interest among voters baffled by an electoral system which could return a crippled parliament, leave more than a hundred seats unfilled and sow political chaos. The election could also widen the divide between the country's nationalist west and the pro-Russian east and south, which have less than a firm commitment to Ukrainian statehood. Kravchuk, making his third major television appearance in a week on Friday, said that parliament, if unable to function, "will turn over its powers on the economy, corruption and fighting organised crime to the president".
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politics
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1994-03-01