Jisc MediaHub

Reuters News

RUSSIA/SPACE: RUSSIAN PRESIDENT YELTSIN MARKS 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF MAN'S FIRST SPACE MISSION

thumbnail image

Russian President Boris Yeltsin marked the 35th anniversary of man's first space mission at a special award ceremony held at the Kremlin on Friday (April 12). ------------------------------------------------------ Sergey Avdeev and Yuri Gidzenko, members of the Mir space station crew who came back to earth on February 29, 1996, were among the group of scientists and astronauts who received awards from the Russian president. Avdeev, Gidzenko and (Germany's) Thomas Reiter were the 20th crew to visit and work out of the Mir space station. The Russian astronauts left Earth on September 3, 1995 and had been on Mir since their Soyuz spacecraft linked up with the space station a few days later. Their mission originally planned for 135 days, was extended by 45 days due to delays in the construction of a Soyuz booster rocket used to launch the return vessel. Addressing the gathering of scientists, researchers and developers in the Kremlin, President Boris Yeltsin said he was about to sign a special decree granting additional financing to the Russian space programme. He said that despite economic problems the Russian space industry was experiencing, scientists had managed to advance it considerably over the past several years. The Mir space station is one of the few Soviet space projects to be kept going since Russia took over the Soviet Union's space industry. A workhorse of the Soviet space programme, the orbital Mir station celebrated its tenth anniversary this year (1996). It was designed as a model for a hugely expensive programme of piloted space labs. In the late 1980s, Mir became a base for the Intercosmos - a Soviet financed scheme for space research in the Warsaw pact countries. The launch of a Soviet-Syrian crew in 1989 was the start of a unique programme of international scientific co-operation, which recently enjoyed a strong revival within the framework of the Euromir project. Space missions with the German and American cosmonauts onboard the Mir station have pumped much-needed cash into Russia's space programme, which is suffering badly from underfunding.

dc:identifier
043-00039453
dc:source
Reuters News
dc:title
RUSSIA/SPACE: RUSSIAN PRESIDENT YELTSIN MARKS 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF MAN'S FIRST SPACE MISSION
dc:type
MovingImage
mhub:credit
Reuters
dc:description
Russian President Boris Yeltsin marked the 35th anniversary of man's first space mission at a special award ceremony held at the Kremlin on Friday (April 12). ------------------------------------------------------ Sergey Avdeev and Yuri Gidzenko, members of the Mir space station crew who came back to earth on February 29, 1996, were among the group of scientists and astronauts who received awards from the Russian president. Avdeev, Gidzenko and (Germany's) Thomas Reiter were the 20th crew to visit and work out of the Mir space station. The Russian astronauts left Earth on September 3, 1995 and had been on Mir since their Soyuz spacecraft linked up with the space station a few days later. Their mission originally planned for 135 days, was extended by 45 days due to delays in the construction of a Soyuz booster rocket used to launch the return vessel. Addressing the gathering of scientists, researchers and developers in the Kremlin, President Boris Yeltsin said he was about to sign a special decree granting additional financing to the Russian space programme. He said that despite economic problems the Russian space industry was experiencing, scientists had managed to advance it considerably over the past several years. The Mir space station is one of the few Soviet space projects to be kept going since Russia took over the Soviet Union's space industry. A workhorse of the Soviet space programme, the orbital Mir station celebrated its tenth anniversary this year (1996). It was designed as a model for a hugely expensive programme of piloted space labs. In the late 1980s, Mir became a base for the Intercosmos - a Soviet financed scheme for space research in the Warsaw pact countries. The launch of a Soviet-Syrian crew in 1989 was the start of a unique programme of international scientific co-operation, which recently enjoyed a strong revival within the framework of the Euromir project. Space missions with the German and American cosmonauts onboard the Mir station have pumped much-needed cash into Russia's space programme, which is suffering badly from underfunding.
dc:subject
politics
science and technology
mhub:temporal-coverage
1996-04-12