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GERMANY: PETER GRAF AND HIS FORMER TAX ADVISER JOACHIM ECKARDT START CLOSING STATEMENTS IN TAX TRIAL

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Lawyers for Peter Graf, father of world women's tennis number one Steffi Graf, and his former tax adviser Joachim Eckardt, started their closing statements in the trial involving charges of tax evasion in Mannheim on Friday (January 17). On Tuesday (January 14) prosecutors asked the court to jail Peter Graf, 58, for six years and nine months and his former tax adviser Joachim Eckardt, 49, for four years and nine months. Prosecutors told the Mannheim court on Tuesday Graf had tried to evade 19.2 million marks (12.19 million U.S. dollars) in tax on his daughter's earnings between 1989 and 1993. It has also emerged during the trial that the German Tennis Federation (DTB) paid the tennis star hundreds of thousands of dollars annually for "services and advertising" in connection with DTB-run events in Hamburg and Berlin. Steffi Graf confirmed on Friday (January 17) that the women's tennis circuit was investigating claims she took money against the tour's rules. Graf risks a three month ban and a fine of up to 50,000 US dollars if the allegations are proved. Peter Graf's trial, which began last September, has attracted huge media interest. The verdict is expected on January 24 -- just hours before the women's final in Australia. Graf has said she will play on whatever happens.

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043-00040131
dc:source
Reuters News
dc:title
GERMANY: PETER GRAF AND HIS FORMER TAX ADVISER JOACHIM ECKARDT START CLOSING STATEMENTS IN TAX TRIAL
dc:type
MovingImage
mhub:credit
Reuters
dc:description
Lawyers for Peter Graf, father of world women's tennis number one Steffi Graf, and his former tax adviser Joachim Eckardt, started their closing statements in the trial involving charges of tax evasion in Mannheim on Friday (January 17). On Tuesday (January 14) prosecutors asked the court to jail Peter Graf, 58, for six years and nine months and his former tax adviser Joachim Eckardt, 49, for four years and nine months. Prosecutors told the Mannheim court on Tuesday Graf had tried to evade 19.2 million marks (12.19 million U.S. dollars) in tax on his daughter's earnings between 1989 and 1993. It has also emerged during the trial that the German Tennis Federation (DTB) paid the tennis star hundreds of thousands of dollars annually for "services and advertising" in connection with DTB-run events in Hamburg and Berlin. Steffi Graf confirmed on Friday (January 17) that the women's tennis circuit was investigating claims she took money against the tour's rules. Graf risks a three month ban and a fine of up to 50,000 US dollars if the allegations are proved. Peter Graf's trial, which began last September, has attracted huge media interest. The verdict is expected on January 24 -- just hours before the women's final in Australia. Graf has said she will play on whatever happens.
dc:subject
crime, law and justice
sport
mhub:temporal-coverage
1997-01-17