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BEHIND THE REBEL LINES IN ALGERIA.

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Behind the rebel lines Algerian rebels on patrol near the Tunisian border were accompanied by Visnews recently during intensified warfare against French troops. Commanded by Colonel Si Nasser, the rebel band left their well-protected hideout for the forests. Their goal: the formidable French "Morice" barrier line, fortified with barbed Wire, mines and electrified fences, where our cameramen followed the wire-cutter through to the other side. Said their leader:"We want peace.....but will settle for nothing but independence". Coinciding with our filming came news of an eight-hour battle outside the French-Algerian port of Bone - most daring raid on a major town in Algeria by the rebels this year. French troops, supported by artillery, amour and a squadron of planes wiped out the attacking 44-strong rebel band. Six casualties were reported on the French side. Before they were spotted, the rebels gained control of an area of houses, orchards and vineyards between Bone airport and the town centre. Intelligence officers believed the band was sent from Tunisia to replace one recently destroyed in the Bone region during the recent upsurge of terrorism. According to French Army reports, 435 rebels were killed and 269 captured during the previous week in Algeria. Characteristic of the increase of Algerian terrorism in France, was the murder June 24 of seven Moslems at Villeurbanne, near Lyons. The men, found shot dead with their throats cut are believed to have been killed by four other North Africans. BACKGROUND The Algerian Was has raged for nearly five years - with phases of comparative peace and sudden uprisings. More than 600,000 French troops and 50,000 rebels are engaged in "no quarter" skirmishes. The rebels, all volunteers, are equipped with arms bought from Egypt and East Germany. Paid GBP1 a month, the soldiers live in huts well protected from air detection. Their main diffulties: the superior air-strength of the French - and the "Morice Lines" set up along the Moroccan and Tunisian borders to prevent supplies reaching rebel forces fighting inside Algeria. Recent reports that four leaders of the "provisional Algerian Government" - including leader Ferhat Abbas - had resigned, have been hotly denied.

dc:identifier
045-00036118
dc:source
Visnews
dc:title
BEHIND THE REBEL LINES IN ALGERIA.
dc:type
MovingImage
mhub:credit
Visnews
dc:description
Behind the rebel lines Algerian rebels on patrol near the Tunisian border were accompanied by Visnews recently during intensified warfare against French troops. Commanded by Colonel Si Nasser, the rebel band left their well-protected hideout for the forests. Their goal: the formidable French "Morice" barrier line, fortified with barbed Wire, mines and electrified fences, where our cameramen followed the wire-cutter through to the other side. Said their leader:"We want peace.....but will settle for nothing but independence". Coinciding with our filming came news of an eight-hour battle outside the French-Algerian port of Bone - most daring raid on a major town in Algeria by the rebels this year. French troops, supported by artillery, amour and a squadron of planes wiped out the attacking 44-strong rebel band. Six casualties were reported on the French side. Before they were spotted, the rebels gained control of an area of houses, orchards and vineyards between Bone airport and the town centre. Intelligence officers believed the band was sent from Tunisia to replace one recently destroyed in the Bone region during the recent upsurge of terrorism. According to French Army reports, 435 rebels were killed and 269 captured during the previous week in Algeria. Characteristic of the increase of Algerian terrorism in France, was the murder June 24 of seven Moslems at Villeurbanne, near Lyons. The men, found shot dead with their throats cut are believed to have been killed by four other North Africans. BACKGROUND The Algerian Was has raged for nearly five years - with phases of comparative peace and sudden uprisings. More than 600,000 French troops and 50,000 rebels are engaged in "no quarter" skirmishes. The rebels, all volunteers, are equipped with arms bought from Egypt and East Germany. Paid GBP1 a month, the soldiers live in huts well protected from air detection. Their main diffulties: the superior air-strength of the French - and the "Morice Lines" set up along the Moroccan and Tunisian borders to prevent supplies reaching rebel forces fighting inside Algeria. Recent reports that four leaders of the "provisional Algerian Government" - including leader Ferhat Abbas - had resigned, have been hotly denied.
dc:subject
unrest, conflicts and war
mhub:temporal-coverage
1959-06-26